Mindful Wakeup: Start with a Purpose

An excerpt from 5 Simple Mindfulness Practices for Daily Life

How often have you rushed out the door and into your day without even thinking about how you’d like things to go? Before you know it, something or someone has rubbed you the wrong way, and you’ve reacted automatically with frustration, impatience, or rage—in other words, you’ve found yourself acting in a way you never intended.


You don’t have to be stuck in these patterns. Pausing to practice mindfulness for just a few minutes at different times during the day can help your days be better, more in line with how you’d like them to be.


Explore these five daily practices for bringing more mindfulness into your life:

Marta Locklear/Stocksy

Mindful Wakeup: Start with a Purpose

Intention refers to the underlying motivation for everything we think, say, or do. From the brain’s perspective, when we act in unintended ways, there’s a disconnect between the faster, unconscious impulses of the lower brain centers and the slower, conscious, wiser abilities of the higher centers like the pre-frontal cortex.


Given that the unconscious brain is in charge of most of our decision-making and behaviors, this practice can help you align your conscious thinking with a primal emotional drive that the lower centers care about. Beyond safety, these include motivations like reward, connection, purpose, self-identity and core values.


Setting an intention—keeping those primal motivations in mind—helps strengthen this connection between the lower and higher centers. Doing so can change your day, making it more likely that your words, actions and responses— especially during moments of difficulty—will be more mindful and compassionate.

This practice is best done first thing in the morning, before checking phones or email.

1.

On waking, sit in your bed or a chair in a relaxed posture.

Close your eyes and connect with the sensations of your seated body. Make sure your spine is straight, but not rigid

2.

Take three long, deep, nourishing breaths.

Breathing in through your nose and out through your mouth. Then let your breath settle into its own rhythm, as you simply follow it in and out, noticing the rise and fall of your chest and belly as you breathe.

3.

Ask yourself: “What is my intention for today?”

Use these prompts to help answer that question, as you think about the people and activities you will face. Ask yourself:

How might I show up today to have the best impact?

What quality of mind do I want to strengthen and develop?

What do I need to take better care of myself?

During difficult moments, how might I be more compassionate to others and myself?

How might I feel more connected and fulfilled?

4.

Set your intention for the day. 

For example, “Today, I will be kind to myself; be patient with others; give generously; stay grounded; persevere; have fun; eat well,” or anything else you feel is important.

5.

Throughout the day, check in with yourself.

Pause, take a breath, and revisit your intention. Notice, as you become more and more conscious of your intentions for each day, how the quality of your communications, relationships, and mood shifts.

Full Article:


5 Simple Mindfulness Practices for Daily Life


BY PARNEET PALCARLEY HAUCKELISHA GOLDSTEINKYRA BOBINET, AND CARA BRADLEY


Kornfield, Jack, et al. “5 Simple Mindfulness Practices for Daily Life.” Mindful, 13 Dec. 2018, www.mindful.org/take-a-mindful-moment-5-simple-practices-for-daily-life/.

Marketing and design Coordinator

Rachel Wixey & Associates

[Emily]

I chose this article because it's easy to lose site of little victories. These may seem like little things, but setting small goals for yourself throughout the day not only leaves you feeling accomplished, but mindful as well. 

admin
 

>